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Irma and termites go hand in hand   arrow

Homes throughout the bay area of Florida are under constant attack by termites, but homes aren’t the only target on this pest’s lists. Termites are wood feeding insects and live in large colonies, like a honey bee or an ant.

In forests, colonies play an important ecological roll in nature by feeding on decaying wood found on the soil floor. In addition to feeding on fallen trees and logs, termites will also feed on building materials found in houses.

It is estimated that soil dwelling termites have caused an estimated eleven billion in damages per year in the U.S. alone.

Pest control companies have long been battling termites in Florida, but an invasive termite from Asia has been particularly troublesome, not only in Florida but the rest of the Southern United States. This invasive termite, called the Formosan termite, was first introduced into Florida at Hallandale Beach in 1981.
While many native termite species have colony sizes with thousands of individuals present, Formosan termites can have millions of individuals in a single colony. This large colony size allows this species to cause significantly more damage to man-made structures than other species.
Formosan termites feed on the hardwood, the dead center of a tree, and can end up leaving the tree hollow. After hollowing out the tree, the termites will fill in the hollowed-out area with nesting material. The hollowed-out trees are more susceptible to falling from wind damage during heavy storms.
Termites also like to invest fallen trees as mentioned earlier, so when Irma came through and knocked down droves of even the largest of Florida’s trees, it made a lot more space for the termites to live. It’s almost like they work together.

Formosan termites feed on the hardwood, the dead center of a tree, and can end up leaving the tree hollow. After hollowing out the tree, the termites will fill in the hollowed-out area with nesting material. The hollowed-out trees are more susceptible to falling from wind damage during heavy storms.